Robotic Surgery

The future is now – and it’s in Covington.


Every superhero needs a sidekick. It just so happens that the healthcare heroes at St. Tammany Health System have robotic ones.

Long established as the first robotics institute along the I-12 corridor, STHS has time and again proven its dedication to providing local residents with the most up-do-date, state-of-the-art technology to help our award-winning medical team conduct even more efficient and precise surgeries – which means an even better experience for our patients. 

That’s especially true in our operating rooms, where our surgeons make use of the da Vinci Surgical System to aid in performing minimally invasive surgeries, the Stryker Mako system for total knee and hip replacements, and Synaptive Medical’s Modus V robotic microscope with BrightMatter technology for highly complex brain surgeries. 

Robots are also at work, however, in almost every other room in our Covington hospital, where our dedicated Environmental Services team regularly deploys a fleet of germ-zapping, UV-emitting Lytbots to ensure the safest, cleanest facilities possible.

It’s that sort of embracing of technology that helps St. Tammany Health System continue to shape the future of health on the Northshore, now and for decades to come. 

 


Meet the robots
Among the surgical robots currently in use at St. Tammany Health System are the da Vinci, Mako and Modus V with BrightMatter. Here’s a closer look at each:

Da Vinci 

Surgical expertise meets technology to further bolster STHS’s place at the vanguard of Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci-assisted surgeries on the Northshore, expanding patient access to technology being used for a growing number of surgeries, including minimally invasive procedures to treat pelvic and urologic cancers.

The da Vinci was the first robot purchased by St. Tammany Health System – then St. Tammany Parish Hospital – in 2007. It has proven so popular among surgeons and patients like that the health system has since acquired two additional da Vinci systems. In summer 2019, STHS surgeons conducted their 5,000th da Vinci-assisted surgery.

Learn more about da Vinci-assisted surgery:

 

Mako

Among the newest additions to St. Tammany Health System's robotics arsenal is Stryker's Mako system, which assists surgeons in performing total knee and hip replacements.

“By adding Mako to our robotics inventory, St. Tammany is changing the way orthopedic surgeries are performed across the joint replacement service line,” said orthopedist Roch Hontas MD of STHS's Bone and Joint Clinic. “We’re providing each patient with a far more precise surgery plan based on our own decades of experience coupled with the Mako’s highly detailed imagery.”

Using a virtual 3D model, the Mako System allows surgeons to create each patient’s surgical plan pre-operatively before entering the operating room. During surgery, the surgeon can validate that plan and make any necessary adjustments while guiding the robotic arm to execute that plan.

Learn more about Mako-assisted surgery.  


Modus V with BrightMatter

A robotic arm with high-powered digital microscope, Synaptive's Modus V enables neurosurgeons at STHS to perform complex brain and spine surgeries.

The optics incorporated into the Modus V were originally developed for the International Space Station. Coupled with Synaptive’s BrightMatter technology, which maps the best approach to the targeted area, it often allows for less invasive surgery – even in some cases previously considered inoperable.

“Synaptive’s BrightMatter works in concert with navigated surgical tools and Modus V to deliver the surgeon the best possible visualization and the most direct route to remove the tumor,” explained STPH Director of Surgical Services Nancy Ledet RN.

Learn more about Modus-assisted surgery.


 

Shaping the future of health
For more than 65 years, St. Tammany Health System has been constantly innovating. Nowhere is that more evident than in our embracing of robotic-assisted technologies to help our surgeons provide the best, most precise care possible for the Northshore.